Virtual Horses: A Digital Revolution

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The going looks good: the future of flat racing is showing some promising form. Software developers Playtech recently launched a thrilling new horse racing game called Virtual Horses. The sim perfectly recreates a trip to the local bookies. You can study the form, have a punt on the gee gees, and enjoy the race.

In the game, a detailed racecard of win, place, and perfecta options precedes each race. When you have made your bets, it’s time to enjoy the action. Photo realistic, computer generated, visuals are married with an authentic old school commentary, to deliver a truly engaging online betting experience. It’s a winner.

Saddle Up To Win

Horse racing has been a punter’s favourite ever since Ben Hur revved up his chariot, beat the odds, and wowed the crowds at the Colosseum. In the UK, invading Roman soldiers organised the first tournaments around 200AD. The first officially recorded horse race took place in 1174. The human/equine relationship has a lot of history.

The sport of kings is dead. Long live the sport of kings

Since the beginning, the sport of kings has been ingrained in the English culture. Members of the royal family have been active participants in the sport for generations. UK racetracks like Goodwood, Aintree, and Ascot, are world renowned temples to the sport.

Virtual Horses is the latest game, in a select handful of betting sims, you can play at Casino.com. Until now, most of these games have had a simplistic, cartoon-like, quality and little lasting appeal. What makes this game so different is the attention to detail and the realistic quality of the end result.

The game starts with a blank racecard, complete with options for win, place, and perfecta (correctly guessing the first and second place horses) bets. There are eight horses in the race. This adds up to a total of 72 bets: 8 x win, 8 x place, and 56 perfectas.

After you have made your bets, you click the Bet Now button and the race gets underway. The action takes place at the fictitious Playford Park race course. It’s an eight furlong flat race and the going looks good.

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C GEE GEE I

The CGI (computer generated imagery) gives a natural looking movement to the video footage. It creates the illusion of a real cameraman filming the event. The race voiceover is performed in the style of a classic British commentator like Peter Bromley or Peter O’Sullevan.

As the race runs its course, the virtual cameras switch and pan as if it was a live broadcast. It all adds up to an experience that’s very close to the real thing. It’s can only be a matter of time before the simulated race is identical to its authentic cousin.

CGI has come a long way in recent years. Like most technology development, the leaps are exponential.

Great Moments In CGI:

1973 – Westworld: first digital processed images
1977 – Star Wars: first digital wireframe images
1982 – Tron: first extensive use of CGI
1984 – Pixar Animation arrives: film of bouncing desk lamp wows world
1993 – Jurassic Park: Lucasfilm’s ILM creates magical cinema moment
1995 – Toy Story: first full length CGI movie
1997 – Titanic: the blurring of reality and CGI
2009 – Avatar: face tracking, full CGI.

In 1950, cryptologist and computer scientist Alan Turing addressed the problem of artificial intelligence by proposing an experiment whereby a computer program would fool its user into thinking it’s a real human being. Today, it’s almost impossible to tell the difference between CGI and the real thing, as this show reel from Brainstorm Digital demonstrates.

As technology advances, and simulated sports become even more realistic and compelling, the future for games like Virtual Horses looks like a good bet for both the online casinos and the punters. Playtech have indicated there are more sports sim games on the way.

Why not try it yourself?

If you want to give Virtual Horses a test run, you can have a punt on the game for free at Casino.com. Just open the game in practice or demo mode to try it for yourself. You never know: it could be your lucky day.

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